6/13/18 – Stew

irish-beef-stew-horiz-a2-1800

Welcome to Five Course Trivia! Five days a week, we’ll post five questions about something from the culinary world, from soup to nuts and all dishes in between.

Well, we’ve had some food questions recently, so let’s go to the tape:

LearnedLeague precedent (LL77, MD2) – A Bantu dialect term for “okra” and a Choctaw word for “filé” are possible (and appropriate) origins for the name of what dish?

Okra and filé together only means one food, gumbo. If you need more info on okra, be sure to read the Okra page on here, guest written by Laura Jansen. With this question, I went 1 for 1.

But hey, there’s still plenty of meat on that trivia bone. Now you take this home, throw it in a pot, add some broth, a potato. Baby, you’ve got a stew going. Enjoy!

1. Let’s say you and your best friend in Milwaukee decided you were going to make your dreams come true by opening a restaurant named “Hasenpfeffer Incorporated”. By name alone, it probably means you both would be making a lot of stew with what central ingredient?

2. Taking its name from a similar soup originally made on the Ligurian coast of Italy, what stew seen here, originally made in San Francisco by Italian-American immigrants, made with shrimp, clams, mussels, crabs, and fish, along with a broth of tomato and white wine, and always served with sourdough?

Q2Stew
Question 2

3. Name the French region in yellow shown here, and then name the hard-to-spell fish stew that comes from this region.
Q34. With Belgian origins but created in the Midwest, name the thick stew of meat and vegetables whose name invokes that it may ask you “How you like them apples?”

Q4Stew
Question 4

5. From the French word meaning “smothered”, name the New Orleans stew seen here, often made with crawfish over rice.

Q5Stew
Question 5

6. ¿Qué guiso es esto?

Q6Stew
Question 6

ANSWERS BELOW:

 

1. Rabbit or hare
2. Cioppino
3. Provence, Bouillabaisse
4. Booyah
5. Étouffée
6. Chili con carne

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