2/15/2016 – Lobster

cooked_lobsters_960x360

Welcome to Five Course Trivia! Five days a week, we’ll post five questions about something from the culinary world, from soup to nuts and all dishes in between.

Today, we get to enjoy some plates of lobster! As you probably know, lobsters are only red when they are cooked, but the state of Maine has proudly put pictures of cooked lobsters on various license plates over the years [seen here].

Still, enjoy some certainly cooked lobster!

1. What three words precede “-shell” to create names of the three grades given to caught lobster?

2. The “green stuff” seen while eating lobster, seen here, is the lobster’s liver and pancreas, and is given what term? Its name comes from the Carib for “a sauce of lobster liver”, it is sometimes considered a delicacy when steamed or boiled.

Q2Lobster
Question 2

3. Shown here is what lobster dish, made with cream, cognac, and sherry? First made in the 19th century, its name comes from the last name of the sea captain who created it, except with two of the letters switched.

Q3Lobster
Question 3

4. What is the main condiment in a lobster roll? Served in a hot dog bun, lobster rolls are sold in the New England / Canada area, and are even sold as McLobsters in a certain popular fast food chain.

5. Also known as “spiny lobsters” or “rock lobsters” for you fans of the 70s, what lobster seen in French cuisine and notably has a lack of claws, comes from the French for “locust”?

Q5Lobster
Question 5

Learned League precedent (LL51, MD1) – This culinary term, which is specifically a particular type of miniature lobster, has evolved etymologically into a style of preparation, which involves sauteeing the entree in garlic butter and white wine (and often, topping with bread crumbs).

Tomorrow: Variety is the spice of life, so a variety of spice trivia must be something you need in your life.

ANSWERS BELOW

1. New, hard, old
2. Tomalley
3. Lobster newberg
4. Mayonnaise
5. Langouste
LL. Scampi

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s